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  ... trained as a cabinet maker and was a maker of banjos from about 1895 and sold under his own name and made for other firms and teachers (e.g. Barnes & Mullins, John Alvey Turner, Norton Greenop, Charles Skinner, Len Shevill, G. Scarth).  When Barnes &, Mullins came to London in 1901,and soon after, started their own workshops at Harrow, Middlesex,  John G. Abbott supervised the making of the Barnes & Mullins banjos and zither-banjos.

 

In 1905 he left Barnes & Mullins to form his own company with the title of J. G (George). Abbott & Co. and a factory at 97/99 Hampstead Road, London, N.W.l. The instruments they made were grouped under the general names of "Mirabile" (banjos), "Monarch" (plectrum-banjo and tenor-banjos) and Amboyna" (Zither-banjos).

 

About 1928 his workshops were transferred to 44 Chalton Street,Euston Road (where his son-learned the art of instrument making) and four years later he became, part of the Besson Co., when his works were transferred to Besson’s premises at Stanhope Place, Marble Arch, London, when the making of banjos virtually ceased, his activities being devoted to making plectrum guitars (sold under the brand of "Aristone").

 

In 1936 he suffered from serious internal trouble from which he never fully recovered. He died on February 11, 1938 after a brief illness.   John (“Jack") Abbott, son of the above learned the craft of instrument making in his father's workshops.  When his father joined Besson & Co. in 1932, he established his own one room work-shops at various addresses in London for the making of, mostly, guitars.   He did make a few banjos and even steel guitars with a pickup,  which were branded "Abbott-Victor”.  He gave up business in 1957.

John G Abbott    1878 to 1938

union jack next maker JG Abbott No 5 sn 4565